An Interview with Town Manager Jim Malloy

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An Interview with Select Board Chair Doug Lucente

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Now Virtual: Futures Panel April 2nd

Futures Panel: Challenges & Opportunities for Lexington

Futures Panel: Challenges & Opportunities for Lexington
April 2, 2020, 7-9:00 PM
This will be a virtual panel.
You can join the event by clicking this link before the event begins: 
https://zoom.us/j/891896344

Please join the 20/20 Vision Committee for an evening of thought-provoking speakers and topics as we host “Futures Panel: Challenges & Opportunities for Lexington”.  The evening marks a milestone in the first 20 years of Lexington’s long-range planning process and seeks to engage the community in shaping a vision of our town’s future.

Our panelists will peer into the future, highlighting the challenges and opportunities facing the regional economy, the evolving expectations for public education, and opportunities for using data and technology in planning and delivery of town services.


Jay Kaufman, Beacon Leadership Collaborative

Former State Representative for Lexington
MODERATOR
Jay Kaufman brings his deep knowledge of Lexington and his love of education and policy to guiding this important conversation about the future of Lexington.

 

Nariman Behravesh, PhD, Chief Economist, HIS Markit
ECONOMIC TRENDS AFFECTING LEXINGTON’S FUTURE
The US economic recovery is likely to continue for another year or two. In this environment, income growth and house price increases in Lexington will remain above average. In the coming decade, educational attainment and the Asian share of Lexington’s population will also continue to rise. Housing affordability and education funding will persist as top challenges for the town.

 

Julie Hackett, EdD, Superintendent, Lexington Public Schools
EMERGING EDUCATION & TECHNOLOGY TRENDS
Dr. Hackett will discuss emerging educational technology trends and innovative learning practices that will prepare all LPS students to be “future-ready” and achieve the district’s new mission of “Joy in learning, curiosity in life, and compassion in all we do.”

 

Daniel O’Brien, PhD, Associate Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs and Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University; Co-Director, Boston Area Research Initiative
SMART CITIES — AND TOWNS   OF TOMORROW
Professor O’Brien will describe how data and technology are advancing city planning and services in metropolises like Boston, and how suburbs and towns—like Lexington and its neighbors—can leverage the same opportunities in their own work.

 

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East Meets West – A Shadaj Baithak Event

Lexington nonprofit organization will present a cultural event co-sponsored by Lexington Community Education and Community Endowment of Lexington (www.lexingtonendowment.org).

 

Indian Classical Music Appreciation Workshops on Monday, Tuesday & Thursday, September 23, 24, 26 at 7:30 pm at Cary Library.

Please join us three nights this week for an informal and informational workshop on Indian classical music.
Monday, 09/23: Similarities and differences between Indian Classical Music and Jazz, with Phil Scarff
Tuesday, 09/24: Indian Classical Violin, with Tara Anand
Thursday, 09/26: Percussion in Indian Classical Music, with Amit Kavthekar

CONCERT:

Friday, September 27,  8.00 pm :  Concert
Venue:  Scottish Rite Masonic Museum, 33 Marrett Rd., Lexington, MA 02420

Tickets:   www.shadaj.org  (Premium: $100,  Regular: $30)
FREE for Shadaj Members and Students (Only upon RSVP)
Upgrade available for Shadaj members to Premium seating ​

Become a SHADAJ Member :  http://shadaj.org/membership.html 

Note: 

  • Admission will be handled on a first come first serve basis.  Members must RSVP to secure a seat.

About the Artists :​
Composer and performer, Pandit Shubhendra Rao is ranked amongst the key soloists of India who lived with his guru, Pandit Ravi Shankar in the Guru-Shishya Parampara for over 10 years, assisting him in concerts and compositions all over the world. He is an unmatched master at his instrument whose playing reminds the listener of the masters of yore transformed into today’s era.
Saskia Rao-De Haas (Cello)
Saskia Rao-de Haas is a brilliant cellist and composer from the Netherlands who is based in India. She has enriched North Indian classical music with her unique instrument, the Indian cello, and created a distinctive playing style with it. She studied with Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia as well as at top institutes in the West, CODARTS, and the University of Amsterdam. In addition to her prestigious status in India, Saskia is an accomplished Western
Aditya Kalyanpur, a child prodigy, is one of the leading young generation tabla players of the Panjab Gharana. A prime disciple of the legendary Ustad Allarakha and Ustad Zakir Hussin, Aditya has performed with all the leading artists all around the world in all major music festivals. Aditya is a talented tabla solo artist who is equally adept at accompanying, fusion music and have several albums to his credit.

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Lexington Unites for Puerto Rico!

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https://colonialtimesmagazine.com/9811-2/

WWI Poppy Gala Aims to Set Upbeat Tone for Centennial

Oct. 19, 6 pm, Masonic Lodge, 3 Bedford St. Lexington.  Tickets: $125, tables of 8 $1,000.

By Craig Sandler

As the Great War ended a century ago, Lexington shared the world’s sense of relief, hope and joy – and the Lexington Historical Society plans to bring that same spirit to an October gala celebrating the centennial.

The Society’s Armistice Day Poppy Gala, Oct. 19 at the Masonic Lodge on the Green, will take place in the middle of a series of programs and observances to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I.  The fundraiser is a major source of the revenue the Historical Society must raise to carry out its mission of historical stewardship and preservation, education, and community events.

The poppy theme comes from the central symbol of the “War to End Wars.”  The poppies a young wounded soldier observed on the graves of combat casualties in Flanders Field, Belgium, capture both the mournfulness and resilient spirit that attended the signing of the Armistice, Nov. 11, 1918.

That autumn, as soldiers came marching home to Lexington and across the nation, it was thought the war had opened a new era of peace.  That hope proved false, but the war did give the nation a sense of mission as a global force for democracy and freedom.  And the fall of 1918 was a time of optimism.

That spirit of joy will be nurtured at the Gala, a plated, sit-down dinner, with a series of musicians performing songs that capture the mood of the time in melody.   The acclaimed Lexington High School jazz band will play popular music of the day, followed by Elizabeth and Allie Whitfield, a mother-daughter singing duet.  Pianist Barbara Hutchinson will provide the mood music during dinner.

“We hope to commemorate the centennial from a post-war perspective,” said Erica McAvoy, the Society’s executive director.  It’s not going to be somber.  We want the spirit to be bright, happy and jovial, and we’re hoping people are going to come in, hear the jazz band and catch the tone of celebration.”

At the same time, the Gala is an opportunity for Lexington’s and other local history lovers to support the unique programs and crucial preservation mission of the Historical Society.  Besides dinners tickets ($125), attendees and fans of the Society can buy space in the program book, and messages honoring loved ones and family members who’ve served in the armed forces are welcome.  Sponsorships are also available and will directly help the Society fulfill its mission. Contact Erica McAvoy at (781) 862-1703 or director@lexingtonhistory.org.   Besides music and dining, the Gala will feature a silent auction, including airfare for two anywhere in the U.S. and a Portsmouth, N.H., getaway.

 

 

Oct. 19, 6 pm, Masonic Lodge, 3 Bedford St. Lexington.  Tickets: $125, tables of 8 $1,000.

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Halloween in the Center!

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Veterans Day in Lexington

Veterans Day Breakfast

  • Veterans Breakfast, Saturday, November 4, Keilty Hall, St. Brigid’s Church
  • Sponsored by The Town Celebrations Committee in partnership with the Lexington Rotary and the Lexington/Bedford Veterans Services Office.
  • Tickets may be obtained at the Lexington Community Center and Michelson’s Shoes in Lexington Center. Admission is free but a ticket is required.
  • Coffee 8:30 a.m. Program starts 8:50 a.m. Breakfast served 9:00 a.m.
  • Rotary Club members will serve a full breakfast catered by Neillio’s.
  • Complimentary service portraits by professional photographer Dave Tabeling
  • More than 20 door prizes donated by local businesses.
  • For questions on the event, contact Veterans Services Director Gina Rada at grada@lexingtonma.gov or 781 698-4848.

 

Karen Budnick

Karen Budnick, LICSW, Senior Social Worker and Coordinator of the No Veteran Dies Alone program at the Bedford VA Hospital, will deliver the keynote address at the sixth annual Veterans’ Breakfast on Saturday, November 4, 2017 at Keilty Hall, St. Brigid’s Church, 2001 Massachusetts Avenue.
For the past eight years, Karen has served as the Social Worker at the David James Hospice Unit at the Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Administration Hospital in Bedford. This unit includes its own dedicated physician, social worker, psychologist, nursing staff, volunteers and chaplain to care for veterans at the end of their lives with dignity, respect and compassion. “There is much suffering and hardship in the world today” Karen says, “and I view my job as helping to alleviate suffering and to bring light, love, peace and harmony to those veterans who are taking their final journey.”
Many veterans arrive at the hospice unit with serious psychic and medical issues – war injuries, PTSD, addictions of all kinds – that in turn have created sadness, loss, anger and separations from their families. As veterans approach the end of life, many yearn to mend these hurts and make peace with their families (and many families want to do the same). The love and support that the Hospice Program, Karen and the volunteers provide to veterans and families helps them open their hearts to forgiveness of self and forgiveness of others, often bringing peace and understanding before the veteran embarks on the final journey.
Karen holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Arizona and a Master of Social Work from Yeshiva University.

 

Veterans Day Parade & Ceremony
PARADE
Gather in parking lot behind
Police Station 9:30 a.m.
Step off 10:00 a.m.
CEREMONY
Inside Cary Hall, 11:00 a.m.

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Remembering Ken Donnelly

By Jim Shaw

Ken Donnelly

Few people in life have that special something, Ken Donnelly was such a person. He knew early on that his calling was to serve.  Whether it was as a fire fighter, a union leader, or as a state senator, Ken Donnelly epitomized the meaning public service.  Senator Donnelly, or simply Ken as he preferred to be called, recently lost his battle with brain cancer. And, although he may be gone, his legacy will carry on through the lives he touched along the way.

I first met Ken soon after I took my first job after college.  I was hired by the Massachusetts AFL/CIO to serve as the program director for young union members.  The program was intended to motivate young union members to be more involved in the political process.  One of the first people I was introduced to was a young legislative agent from the Professional Fire Fighters of Massachusetts (PFFM), his name was Ken Donnelly.  The fact that he was a Lexington fire fighter was completely coincidental. Ken took me around and introduced me to several young union activists who became the core of our program.  Most of them went on to do great things.  Ironworker Steve Lynch is now a Congressman, Red Cap Steve Tolman is a former senator and current president of the Mass AFL/CIO, assembly worker George Noel became Commissioner of Labor in Massachusetts, and Ken Donnelly went on to become the second highest ranking fire fighter and a powerful member of the State Senate.

My relationship with Ken continued for a longtime.  We became friends.  Good friends.  That was easy with Ken.  He made everyone feel as though they were a good friend.  That was his gift.

Ken spent nearly four decades as a full-time Lexington Fire Fighter.  He soon became president of the local union, then turned his attention to the state fire fighter organization.  In the early 1980s, he was elected Legislative Agent for the PFFM.  He became close to Bob McCarthy who served at the time as president of the Watertown local. Then tragedy struck the PFFM when longtime president Dusty Alward was killed in an automobile accident.  McCarthy and Donnelly took the helm of the PFFM and worked together until Ken’s election to the State Senate in 2008.

Ken was a teacher by nature.  He liked to identify talented young people and help bring them along.  Current Lexington Fire Lieutenant Mark Ferreira was one of his proteges.  Mark explained that Ken was a special kind of leader.  Almost as if he led from behind, because he was always pushing you along trying to bring the best out.  Mark said, “I first met Ken when I joined the fire department 31 years ago. I was a young kid of 21 years and he took me under his wing. He was 21 when he joined the Department too. He eventually became my lieutenant and I was on the truck with him on a regular basis. He taught me how to be a good firefighter and introduced me to the importance of being involved in the union. Serving the public was important to him, so was his desire to serve his fellow firefighters.”

Ferreira explains that Ken spent the greater part of his career at the East Lexington fire house. He said, “He was the union president for the Lexington local and eventually became the legislative agent for the state fire fighters union or the Professional Fire Fighters of Massachusetts. After several years of serving as legislative agent, he was elected statewide secretary-treasurer of the PFFM. Ken was the best! He always took good care of his crew. He was always fun to be around. He had a great sense of humor, but he took his responsibilities as a fire fighter very seriously. One of the things I remember most fondly is that his crew always ate very well. Ken was a great cook. He would cook every Sunday at the East Lexington station. I remember one time we were working a shift on New Year’s Eve and when the other station called to say they ordered Chinese food, Ken wanted better.  He decided we weren’t going to eat “that junk” and he cooked beautiful homemade Chinese food for everyone at the East Lexington station. It was the most delicious Chinese food I’ve ever eaten.”

Mark talks about Ken’s dedication to fire fighters who made the ultimate sacrifice.  Mark said, “Ken felt that fallen fire fighters had waited too long to be recognized in way befitting to their sacrifice, so he helped to move forward the Massachusetts Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial.”   Ferreira continued, “He served on the original board of directors. He was very active in securing the site, raising the needed funds, and the effort to construct the memorial. He was particularly involved with the design of the memorial. He served as chairman of the board for a while right up until the time he passed away. We will be adding his name to the memorial at a ceremony this fall”

In a final thought, Mark shared what might be Ken’s greatest legacy.  He said, “What made Ken great and where he succeeded, was that he could always find common ground with both sides. His gift was his ability to educate. Whether it was negotiating in Lexington or as a member of the Senate, he was effective because he was fair and he educated those he dealt with. He was a special kind of a person who left an indelible impression, not only here in Lexington but in the town of Arlington where he lived and in the Senate where in nine short years he became a top member of the leadership.”

Ken had the ability to affect change and motivate people.  A longtime friend of Ken’s is United States Senator Ed Markey.  I talked with Senator Markey about Ken and as you might guess, he said Ken was one of his “go to guys for advice and counsel.”  Senator Markey said, “Ken Donnelly was Massachusetts. He was a guy who worked his way up, worked his way through UMass, was a fire fighter for thirty-seven years. He was a happy warrior. I always thought of him as a sort of Hubert Humphrey, fighting as hard as he could for the causes which he cared about, while at the same time enjoying the battle. He communicated that to everyone with a wink and a smile.”

Recalling a night of just unwinding with his friend Ken, Senator Markey talked about spending time at Fenway Park. He said, “I miss him. I took him in 2013 to the deciding game of the ALCS championship at Fenway Park. You might remember that was the game where Shane Victorino hit a grand slam to win the series. We sat in the third row next to Mike Pence and his wife. For Kenny it was a beautiful moment. He got the Red Sox, the Governor of Indiana, and the new U.S. Senator. We talked politics and baseball for 4 hours culminating in Victorino’s grand slam to win the game 5-2. We left and went back to his car and he drove me back home to Malden. That’s a great memory for me. I remember him as a good friend, and just an all around decent guy. He was a down-to-earth guy who loved politics and loved everything about life itself. He never forgot where he came from.”

Ken walked with kings and commoners alike.  Everyone was equal in his eyes.  After a long day of fighting fires, negotiating with governmental leaders, writing pension policy, or sitting through long legislative hearings, Ken was at his best when he was home on the grill or in the kitchen.  That’s how Ken showed his love.  Good food and companionship.  Ken and I spent lots of time together during his campaigns and driving to political conventions.  He always made me feel needed by asking me for advice, even though he already had the answers.  He was a friend to me and my family.  I will always remember his kindness, guidance and generosity of spirit.

Ken was a Senator and a fire fighter, but his deepest devotion was reserved for his family. His wife Judy was at the center of his existence.  The same is true about his children Ryan, Keith and Brenna. His grand children too.  He valued his time with family.  I remember Ken telling me that being a Senator was not going to interfere with spending time with his family.  And it didn’t. He valued his time at home and visiting their place in New Hampshire.  He loved the outdoors and spending time with his kids.

The pageantry at his funeral was nothing less than spectacular.  Flagged-draped fire trucks, hundreds of fire fighters lined up in formal uniforms, hundreds of friends and family were all there to pay respect to a simple man who made a lasting impression.

 

Rest in peace my good friend.

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