Senior Matters

Using Technology for Senior Programming

By Hemali Shah- Senior Services Coordinator

Technology is changing the way we interact with the world and the way the world interacts with us. The biggest impact we have noticed is the role of technology in the lives of our seniors.

Technology is enabling the baby boomers to age in place safely and live in their homes longer. Programs such as life alert bracelets, which detect falls and call 911 with a push of a button, to various applications that track medication management have empowered aging adults to remain independent. There are applications for caregivers to keep track of doctor’s appointments, home health workers’ schedules, and family member tasks. The uses of technology are endless.

The biggest role technology plays in the lives of seniors is preventing isolation. Online education, chat, e-mail and increased phone availability have now made it possible for older adults to stay connected within their community and actively seek out activities that will ensure their overall well-being. The ease of using devices such as smartphones, tablets, and laptops has made it increasingly easy to stay connected with family members across the country and the world. PEW Research Center has found that over 34% of Americans ages 65 and older use social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter to stay connected to loved ones. We also live in a time where we can connect live with our loved ones through Skype, Facetime, WhatsApp Video Calls, and many other applications that lessen the feeling of isolation and loneliness.

Lexington Senior Services Department is teaching and assisting our Lexington seniors to properly use the technology available to them. One of our most popular programs involves Lexington High School students, who facilitate a technology drop-in program as well as a monthly presentation on a popular topic. The high school students help one-on-one during the technology drop-in time to troubleshoot devices, set-up emails, reset passwords, and help navigate couponing sites. The monthly presentations focus on a specific technology topic, such as how to video chat or how to upload photos to Facebook. Both of these programs provide an opportunity for our seniors to connect to Lexington teens and learn something new.

Another way we use technology is through our local cable company, Lex Media. In the last year, we have videotaped our more popular senior programs, such as our Older Wiser Life Long Learner (OWLL) classes and the Economic and Finance Series. Both of these programs can be found on demand at the Lex Media website for viewing after the program has taken place live. Our seniors are able to participate in programs, make-up missed classes, and continue to learn by having access to new programs made available on demand.

Lastly, we have started offering live and interactive virtual programming as part of our ongoing senior programming. Interactive virtual programming is our way of connecting to individuals, museums, non-profit organizations, and schools across the country and the world to enhance our cultural knowledge. During the program, we connect live on video chat with a staff member of the partner organization to learn about a specific topic. For example, we connected with a private school in Ghana, Africa where we learned from the students about African culture, history, and food. The African students were able to ask our Lexington seniors questions about American culture and aging in America. Technology makes it easy to speak with people across the globe without leaving the comfort of your home and community.

Our goal at the Lexington Senior Services Department is to help our seniors live longer by being active participants. Whether they choose to be active by coming to the Lexington Community Center or watching the programs from their home if they are homebound, we strive to offer something for every audience. For more information, check out our newsletter, The Sage, online or pick up a copy at the Lexington Community Center. You can also like us on Facebook!

TO REACH US:

Phone: 781-698-4840

Online: Lexington Senior Services https://www.lexingtonma.gov/human-services/senior-services

Lexington Human Services Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lexingtonhumanservices/

 

Senior Matters columns are presented to the Lexington community through a collaboration with the Lexington Human Services Department Council on Aging. Information provided in these columns is general in nature and not intended to substitute for individualized professional advice. Please see a professional for any concerns you may have about this topic or any others in a Senior Matters column. LEXINGTON COMMUNITY CENTER 39 Marrett Road, Lexington, MA 02421.

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Navigating How to Safely Age in Place

 

Alicia Grunes, RN, BSN Lexington Human Services  Nurse

By Alicia Grunes, RN, BSN

Lexington Human Services Nurse

The number of Lexington senior residents choosing to “age in place” is continually increasing. It takes a great deal of work and planning to remain in your own home as you age. Those beautiful area rugs that were passed down from generation to generation are a major tripping hazard. The flight of stairs you used to run up and down without a second thought now take you twice the time to maneuver. Early recognition of the obstacles in your home that could potentially become a health or fall hazard is paramount to aging in place.

As the Human Services Nurse for the Town of Lexington, I get several calls from spouses or children of seniors, the majority of these calls happen after the loved one has fallen. They are in a panic looking for advice on how to make their loved ones’ home safe. While there a number of resources on how to improve the safety of a home, most of these take time. Time is the key word. When someone wants to age in place, there is not always enough time to make the necessary adjustments to the home. Sitting down with your family and creating an aging in place safety plan is something that should be done early, preferably before any falls happen or new conditions are diagnosed.

When should this planning start to take place? One recommendation is to have this discussion while you are sitting down with family talking about your living will, health care proxy and/or power of attorney. The earlier you think about all of these things, the better prepared you will be. Even if you do not take drastic steps such as installing a chair lift or renovating a bathroom, you will at least have a plan of what changes you may need to make to the home.

Preventing falls in the home is the top priority when aging in place, for good reason. According to the Center for Disease Control, falls are the leading cause of injury and death in older Americans. Falls result in more than 2.8 million injuries treated in emergency departments annually, including over 800,000 hospitalizations and more than 27,000 deaths. Suffering from a fall threatens your independence, and ultimately your ability to remain living in your own home. Ask your physician about a falls risk assessment. Not many people ask why they are falling, they assume it is because of old age, which is false. Find out if there are specific ways you can prevent falls from happening.

Besides tripping hazards, there other changes to the home environment that may need to be made that you wouldn’t think of on a daily basis. If you were to be wheelchair bound, are there clear pathways throughout the house? If your dishes are up high in a cabinet, would you safely be able to get them down to eat a meal? Do you wear a personal assistive device that you could push for help should you need it? How about the bathroom – do you have a shower you can walk right into, or do you need to step over a bathtub wall? Going room to room and thinking of worse case scenarios is what will help ensure you make the necessary changes to safely age in place.

If you or a loved one is planning on aging in place, take the time to prepare. Having other people look throughout the home with you to help identify hazards is important. You may not realize the neatly stacked pile of books on the side of the stairs can become a fall hazard. There are clinicians who can come to the home and provide you with a home fall risk assessment. Nurses, Physical Therapists, and Occupational Therapists are all trained in how to identify fall and health hazards throughout a home. Speak to your doctor about your concerns; most insurances will cover a home risk assessment by an skilled professional.

If you decide to age in place, you are joining 80% of seniors in the country who have chosen their home over a facility. There are numerous benefits to remaining in your own home as you age. Aging in place allows you to preserve your independence. Take the necessary steps to safeguard yourself and your home so you can remain there. For more information on how to safely age in place, contact your physician, local home healthcare agency, or Lexington Senior Services at 781-698-4840.

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Tips for Downsizing

DownsizingAdvice from Amy Roberts
at Out of the Box Moves

Thinking about moving out of your home and downsizing to a smaller home?  Out of the Box Moves is a company that specializes in moving and downsizing and has a few tips that will make this process flow smoother. The first step you will have to make is to decide what you want to take with you and what to do with the rest of your stuff!

The best way is to focus on one room at a time, do not try to do the whole house at once; you will get overwhelmed. Work your way around the room clockwise, or if you insist, counter-clockwise.

Ask yourself the following questions:

Do I use it?

When did I use it last?

Do I need it?

You may want to use sticky notes and label things accordingly. Some suggestions we have are to label items: keep, donate, sell, or give to family or friends.  Other items may just go right into the trash bag or recycle bin.  Once your decision is made, place items in a bin or box that is labeled appropriately.

When organizing the master bedroom, go through your clothes in your closet and bureau, and ask yourself the following questions…

When did I wear it last?

Does it still fit? 

Be sure to have a trash bag ready because it is okay to throw out old socks, nylons, or pilled sweaters.   When an item can be appreciated and worn by someone else, it can be donated. Throw out old hangers and give back the metal ones to the dry cleaners.  Look down at all of those shoes on the floor or hiding in boxes. Old sneakers, which are worn down and actually not good for your posture, can go in the trash, and dress shoes that you will never wear again, can be donated.  And do you really need four pairs of bedroom slippers and those chic expensive boots that hurt your feet? It is time to donate those!

I bet there are a lot of things you can throw out in your bathroom!  First, gather all those expired medications and dispose of them according to your community’s guidelines.  Toss the little soaps and shampoos you have collected from hotels and those ragged washcloths and stained towels.  There is probably an old hairdryer that always shorted out and a curling iron or an electric shaver that has not been used in years. Those can all be thrown out as well. A great way of getting rid of your old sheets, towels, and blankets is to donate them to your local animal shelter to help pets in need.

Now in the living room, you may have shelves full of books or maybe even some textbooks from college collecting dust.  Fill grocery bags with these books and donate them to the local library. If you have a very large amount of books, contact More Than Words, a worthy nonprofit organization in Waltham. They will come and pick up the books from your home. You may also have some decorative items in your living room that may be valuable. Have an antique dealer or auctioneer visit your home to provide you with an estimate of what they are worth. It all depends on the condition of the piece and if it is in demand.

Now onto tackling the office…what about those piles of papers, warranties, cancelled checks, and tax returns that you are determined to sort through some day? If you have a good filing system, that’s great.  If not, buy folders and sort through the papers, and then label each folder accordingly. To make this process easier, listen to music or do it while watching T.V. Create a minimal amount of files and at the same time fill the recycle bin with all the unnecessary papers. Confidential papers should always be shredded. If you do not have a shredder, you can take your papers to Staples, which only charges a small fee for shredding. You do not have to keep things for years and years anymore because so much is electronically stored today.

Photographs are an essential part of our lives and a lot of our memories live within them.  So choose a few of your favorite framed photos to bring with you to your new home.  The rest of the photos can be removed from the frames and put into photo albums.  You can also go through and sort your collection of family photos and distribute them to the appropriate family members.  I am sure they would love to have them! Another option is to scan your photos to make them digital, which would enable you to share fond memories online with family and friends and preserve your memories.

And now for the real challenge—the kitchen! When was the last time you used that George Foreman grill or the waffle iron or the electric percolator? If the small appliances are clean and in good working condition, they can be donated. If any of your mugs, plates or glasses are stained or chipped, it is time to toss them into the trash.  Start using your nicer dinnerware, why wait? If you have a collection of vases, keep just a few, recycle the chipped one, and donate the rest.

As far as your garage and attic are concerned, you may need to recruit some family members or a service to help you. Especially, if you have accumulated quite a lot of gardening equipment, paint cans, and old sports equipment over the years.

Another helpful hint is to create a schedule, put it on the fridge, and give yourself a deadline so that this whole process doesn’t drag on and drag you down. By taking this first step of de-cluttering your home, you will be able to envision your new life in your next home surrounded by the things that you chose and that make you happy!

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SENIORS PREPARE FOR WINTER WEATHER!

Senior Citizens are encouraged to prepare for Emergencies such as severe winter weather this time of year.

The Town of Lexington Health Division and the Human Services Department join the Massachusetts Department of Public Health “Together We’re Ready” Campaign to Encourage Senior Citizens, Individuals and Families to Plan Ahead for various Emergencies.  “Emergencies can happen at any time as evident by recent weather related events, such as the record breaking snowfall in Buffalo New York. Taking a few simple steps now to prepare yourself and your family will help Lexington recover more quickly and lessen the impact to your normal schedule.  Every step that we take to prepare ourselves and our families for emergencies makes Lexington stronger and more resilient when the unexpected happens,” said Gerard F. Cody, Health Director for the Town of Lexington. “Now’s the time to be informed, plan ahead, and get prepared.”

Senior Citizens should consider these steps to better prepare for an emergency:

PREPARE A KIT OF EMERGENCY SUPPLIES FOR YOUR HOME

Make an special kit for winter emergencies.

Make a special kit for winter emergencies.

While there are many things that might make you more comfortable, think first about fresh water, food and your specific medical supplies. For example, if you use eyeglass or hearing aids, be sure you always have extra supplies in your kit. Also have copies of your medical insurance, Medicare and Medicaid cards readily available. If you have a service animal, be sure to include food, water, collar with ID tag, medical records and other emergency pet supplies.

Medications and Medical Supplies: If you take medicine or use a medical treatment on a daily basis, be sure you have what you need on hand to remain independent for at least a week and keep a copy of your prescriptions as well as dosage or treatment information. If it is not possible to have a week-long supply of medicines and supplies, keep as much as possible on hand and talk to your pharmacist or doctor about what else you should do to prepare. If you undergo routine treatments administered by a clinic or hospital or if you receive regular services such as home health care, treatment or transportation, talk to your service provider about their emergency plans. Work with them to identify back-up service providers within your area.

Emergency Documents: Include copies of important documents in your emergency supply kits such as family records, medical records, wills, deeds, social security number, charge and bank accounts information and tax records. It is best to keep these documents in a waterproof container. If there is any information related to operating equipment or life-saving devices that you rely on, include those in your emergency kit as well. If you have a communication disability, make sure your emergency information list notes the best way to communicate with you. Also be sure you have cash or travelers checks in your kits in case you need to purchase supplies.

MAKE A PLAN FOR WHAT YOU WILL DO IN AN EMERGENCY

Develop a Family Emergency Plan:  Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so plan how you will contact one another and review what you will do in different situations. Consider a plan where each family member calls, or e-mails, the same friend or relative in the event of an emergency

Create a Personal Support Network: If you anticipate needing assistance during a disaster, ask family, friends and others to be part of your plan. Share each aspect of your emergency plan with everyone in your group, including a friend or relative in another area who would not be impacted by the same emergency who can help if necessary. Include the names and numbers of everyone in your personal support network, as well as your medical providers in your emergency supply kit. If you use a wheelchair or other medical equipment, show friends how to use these devices so they can move you if necessary and teach them how to use any lifesaving equipment or administer medicine in case of an emergency. Practice your plan with those who have agreed to be part of your personal support network.

Consider Your Pets: Whether you decide to stay in your home or go to another home, hotel or shelter, you will need to make plans in advance for your service animal and pets. Keep in mind that what’s best for you is typically what’s best for your animals.  If you choose to leave your home, take your pets with you or make other arrangements to keep them safe.

BE INFORMED ABOUT WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN

Watch television and listen to the radio for official instructions as they become available. For specific news in Lexington, sign up for Code Red® Emergency Notification System. Code Red is utilized by the Town of Lexington to notify residents and businesses by quickly providing information, instructions and updates on an emerging threat or emergency situation.  It is a high speed telephone and text messaging system that uses a combination of published white page listings. Residents and business owners can help ensure a better response by logging on to the Town of Lexington Code Red website, (http://lexingtonma.gov/police/codered.cfm) to add preferred mobile phone numbers, text numbers or email addresses. If you do not have a traditional land line phone service, you can still participate in the Code Red Emergency Notification System but you must log onto the website to add your mobile phone number or email address.

The Together We’re Ready – Massachusetts Prepared campaign features online videos and resources developed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.  Check out the “Together We’re Ready” web page at www.mass.gov/dph/ready  where you can find more information about individual and family preparedness, volunteer opportunities, emergency planning for the whole community and tips for flu prevention.

For a free “Emergency Medical Info Kit”, please visit the Office of Community Development, Health Division in the Town Office Building at 1625 Massachusetts Avenue. If you have any questions concerning this matter, you may contact Gerard F. Cody, REHS/RS at (781) 698-4522 or by email at gcody@lexington.ma.

WINTER DRIVING CAN BE CHALLENGING, EVEN FOR THE MOST EXPERIENCED DRIVERS

Here are some tips from MassDOT Registry of Motor Vehicles Division.

THINK TWICE IF THERE’S SNOW OR ICE

Listen to traffic and weather reports. Use the news as a guide – when school is cancelled, consider staying home.  This allows plows the time and space needed to treat and clear roads of any snow or ice.

PREPARE YOUR CAR FOR WINTER

  • Before driving in winter weather, there are several things you should do to ensure your safety and the safety of others around you.
  • Take extra time to remove ice and snow from your vehicle. Clear all windows, windshield wipers, headlights, and brake lights, forward sensors, and back-up camera.
  • Clear the roof of your car so ice and snow does not blow into vehicles behind you.
  • Keep windshield washer fluid reservoir filled with winter fluid that won’t freeze and keep extra winter fluid in your car.
  • Equip your car with winter wipers
  • Be sure the exhaust pipe is clear of packed snow before starting engine. Cold temperatures affect tires. Check tire pressure with a portable tire gauge, to make sure pressure is equal to the vehicle manufacturer’s recommended inflation pressure. The manufacturer’s recommended inflation pressure is listed in the owner’s manual as well as on the driver’s side door frame of rear edge of the driver’s door.

KEEP THE FOLLOWING ITEMS IN YOUR VEHICLE:

Fully-charged mobile phone; mobile phone car charger; ice scraper; blanket; flashlight; energy bars; water; small shovel; play sand or non-clumping kitty litter. Spread play sand or kitty litter on snow directly in front of and behind tires to create traction for tires that are stuck in snow.

WINTER DRIVING TIPS

  • Motor vehicles perform very differently on ice and snow than on warm, dry pavement. Keep speeds down. Tires have less traction on cold, slick surfaces.
  • Delay driving until snow plows have had time to treat roads and remove snow. If you must go out when it is snowing, start slowly and if it is safe to do so, test your brakes by gently tapping them to see how much traction your tires have.
  • Drive carefully and accelerate slowly.
  • Leave more distance between your vehicle and the vehicles in front of you. More space is required to stop safely on slippery surfaces.
  • Never lock your brakes on icy roads. You will lose steering control. If you skid, remember to turn into the direction of the skid until vehicle straightens out.
  • Drive with headlights on to help you see and be seen.
  • Intersections can be dangerous, even more so in the winter. Heavily traveled intersections can become “polished” and slick. Make turns slowly and gradually. Gently brake and slow the vehicle before a curve, not while you are in it.
  • Give active snow plows plenty of space, leaving at least 5 car lengths between you and the snow plow. Don’t drive beside a snow plow . According to NHTSA, the road behind an active snow plow is safer to drive on. If you find yourself behind a snow plow, stay behind it or use extreme caution when passing.

HANDLING A SKIDDING VEHICLE

  • Handle the skid the same for front-wheel drive and rear-wheel drive vehicles.
  • Fast acceleration can make wheels spin on ice and snow. Locking brakes on icy roads causes the driver to lose steering control. If you skid, stay calm and remove your foot off the gas pedal.
  • Do not hit the brakes – this will make the skid worse.
  • Turn your steering wheel in the direction of the skid. If your rear tires are skidding to the left, turn your steering wheel left. If they are sliding right, steer right.
  • You may need to steer left and right a few times until you get your car completely under control.

More detailed information can be found in the Massachusetts Driver’s Manual at MASSRMV.COM as well as at NHTSA.GOV.

Sources-  http://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle+Owners/Resources/Winter-driving-tips-static

http://www.massrmv.com/rmv/dmanual/chapter_5.pdf

Make an special kit for winter emergencies.

Make an special kit for winter emergencies.

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November is National Family Caregiver Month

Care Managers: A Valuable Resource for Family Caregivers

A By Leslie May-Chibani

POWERFUL TOOLS FOR CAREGIVERS

Free educational workshops offer information and support in a caring environment. Funded in part through the Northwest Suburban Health Alliance/CHNA 15 DoN funds from Lahey Hospital and Medical Center and Winchester Hospital. If you would like more information about upcoming classes, or if your organization would like to host a class, please call Amy DeAngelis at 781-221-7045.

Lexington: January 20 – February 24
Class meets Tuesdays for 6 weeks, 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM.

Please call 781-860-7084 to register. Classes will be held at Lexington Senior Center, 1475 Massachusetts Avenue, Lexington, MA

 

Minuteman Senior Services skilled and experienced Care Manager can be a stabilizing force during times of crisis and transition.  Imagine that someone you love has experienced a health crisis that changes their ability to accomplish basic daily living activities or makes the home no longer a safe or convenient place to live. Coping with increased doctors appointments, medications and the lifestyle changes often required can be overwhelming and stressful, as few of us are prepared to adapt to these changing circumstances. Difficult conversations may be needed among family and friends and decisions made to support a better future.

Most people begin their journey alone and try to work their way through the maze of private and government services making a lot of phone calls, internet searches leading to dead ends, and a lot of time spent just getting oriented to this new landscape. It can be very confusing and time consuming.

An experienced guide to help navigate these systems of care is invaluable, especially when family resources are needed to deal with the emotional aspect of the loss and the changing prospect of future care needs and responsibilities. Care Managers can save a family a lot of time because they know the existing community resources and will create a plan of action to focus the families’ energy and efforts expediting necessary changes.

What does a Care Manager do?

Care Managers begin by having a lengthy discussion with both the person needing assistance and the family to learn about what is important, especially quality of life preferences. Releases are obtained so that physicians can be contacted to review medical history (including current medications), financial information is reviewed to determine eligibility for government funded programs, and insurance information is reviewed to know what benefits are covered – all to establish a comprehensive understanding of the person’s needs and resources.  At this point a care plan with recommendations for the family to consider is created and discussed.  Care options are an important part of the plan, allowing the family to weigh alternatives and be a real partner in the process.

Building a care team is essential to optimizing health and preventing further decline, as well as maximizing the inner resources of the family caring for their loved one.  A Care Manager can help identify family and friends that might be able to help, augmenting the gaps with professionally vetted services, and creating a workload that is healthy and manageable for everyone. Care Managers can assist with medication management, medical appointments and transitions from hospital or another facility to home. They can help with relocation and/or home organization, serve as a liaison to health and social service providers, and communicate with family members near or far.  It is important to continually evaluate the care plan and the care team to ensure that it meets the needs of the entire family.  A Care Manager can monitor the situation and look down the road a bit, modifying the plan and adding members to the team as needed, in order to avoid a crisis whenever possible.

Frequently, caregivers wait until they are heavily stressed and depleted (sometimes to the point of their own health decline) before acknowledging that the workload is too great, instead of putting in adequate supports at the start.  If you think of a bridge and how many supports are needed to carry the weight safely, no one would cross a bridge with only one support or even inadequate support.  It is very dangerous!  Adequate supports strengthen families, often allowing the loved one to remain in the community longer and healthier.

Skill and experience vary among the many professionals offering care management services.  It is important to ask about the Care Manager’s expertise:  do they know the area and the community resources, what license does the Care Manager have, how long have they been practicing, what range of tasks will they provide, what if any financial incentives do they have with any other agencies, and what is their availability after business hours?

Help is just a phone call away.

Minuteman Senior Services is your local Area Agency on Aging, and offers over 20 different programs, including free information and referral to resources both local and long-distance.

The Family Caregiver Support Program is a taxpayer-supported, free service provided locally through Minuteman Senior Services to assist with resource information, emotional support, and a short term action plan with referrals to other services to help family caregivers better manage their needs.  Minuteman Senior Services has worked with hundreds of family members who are caring for an aging parent, an ill spouse, a grandparent caring for a grandchild when the parents are no longer able to, or other family situations.

The evidence-based “Powerful Tools for Caregivers” workshop is a free, six week educational program that gives caregivers the opportunity to focus on themselves, come together with other caregivers who understand the difficulties faced in caring for a loved one over a long period of time, and begin to build the skills necessary to not only survive this caregiving situation but learn how to thrive.  Minuteman Senior Services and the Lexington Council on Aging are joining together to offer this class at the Lexington Senior Center beginning on Tuesday, January 20 through February 24, from 9:00 to 10:30. To register please call 781-860-7084.

Minuteman Senior Services now offers a care management option for seniors, disabled adults of all ages and caregivers. Some people may qualify for subsidized care management and others may access care management on a fee basis through our newest program, Minuteman By Your Side. We bring our 40 years of experience in serving your community to you and your family. Asking for assistance can be difficult but as you work your way over that hurdle know that there are many supports available that you can use to strengthen your situation and your own health.


 

PrintLeslie May-Chibani, Assistant Director of Minuteman Senior Services, has over 15 years of experience working with seniors and their family caregivers of all ages. Call her directly at 781-221-7096 for more information about Minuteman’s new program, Minuteman By Your Side. Please visit www.minutemansenior.org for information about all the programs available.

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Senior Matters~Tips for Recovering at Home and Avoiding Hospital Readmission

By Jack Cross  |

The nurse comes into your hospital room and says that you are ready to be discharged. You’re happy to be going home to the comfortable surroundings of your home and your own bed. The last thing you want is to be readmitted to the hospital because you run into problems taking care of yourself after you are discharged.

The hospital staff also wants your transition from hospital to home to go smoothly with no return visits. However, almost 20 percent of Medicare patients are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days after discharge, according to a New England Journal of Medicine article. This is a huge financial issue for Medicare which is searching for solutions to the “readmission” problem. Why do so many elderly patients need to be re-admitted to the hospital?

They may not understand or may be too weak to fully comprehend the discharge instructions provided by the doctors and nurses.

They may have difficulty understanding and managing changes to their medications.

They may find it difficult to get to follow-up medical appointments because of fatigue or lack of transportation.

They may be too tired or uncomfortable to prepare nutritious meals which can jeopardize their recovery.

They may not recognize warning signs that require medical assistance and may delay notifying their physicians until the situation becomes acute.

They value their independence and may be reluctant to ask for help at home. They may neglect their discharge plan when they return home because they are tired, confused or frustrated but still hesitant to ask questions or to seek help.

When elderly patients are ready to return home from the hospital, it is very important for everyone involved in their care – patients, families and medical caregivers – to be realistic about the challenges facing the elderly while they are recuperating from illness.

As a patient, what can you do to better ensure a successful recuperation after you are discharged from a hospital? When you receive a discharge plan, ask yourself the following questions:

Do you have the names and phone numbers of all medical personnel you may need to contact when you return home?

Do you have a schedule of all follow-up medical appointments? Do you feel strong enough to call to set up medical appointments when you return home? Can you get to these appointments on your own or do you need help with transportation?

Are you willing to ask another family member or professional caregiver to coordinate your discharge plan if you feel too weak to handle it yourself?

Do you need help with normal housekeeping duties, such as food shopping, cooking, household chores and personal care, during your recovery?

Do you have any new dietary restrictions? Do you feel strong enough to prepare nutritious meals and to shop for groceries? Do you understand that certain medications need to be taken with food at certain times of the day or that some medications cannot be taken with specific foods?

Do you have a list of all your medications, especially any new or unfamiliar medications? Do you understand the dosage and when to take your medications? Are you aware of any possible side effects, especially adverse reactions that require prompt medical attention?

Will you be able to pick up prescriptions from your pharmacy and do you know that you can ask for easy-open bottles with large print labels if