CARY LECTURE SERIES – MARCH 4TH

“Spotlight: A Story of Asking the Right Questions and Holding Institutions Accountable”

with Sacha Pfeiffer and Dan Rothstein
CARY HALL • SATURDAY, MARCH 4TH, 2016 AT 8:00 PM

Hear Dan Rothstein and Sacha Pfeiffer speak in Lexington!
The importance of the press and of citizens in demanding a culture of accountability in a democracy. As citizens, how can we learn to ask the right questions and engage in effective action?

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Click to read candidate statements for the March 6th Election.

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http://colonialtimesmagazine.com/8911-2/

Lexington Police Toys for Tots – Fill the Cruiser! Saturday, December 10

toysfortots

Bring a New, Unwrapped Toy

Join the Lexington Police and
Fill the Cruiser for Toys for Tots

Saturday, December 10
9AM – 1PM
1735 Mass Ave, in front of CVS

You can fill a little boy or girl’s holiday season with joy!

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‘The Opiate Crisis in Massachusetts: Causes and Solutions’ at Temple Isaiah

Giles is a consultant with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s Bureau of Substance Abuse Services and the Center for Social Innovation. She teaches at Lesley University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and has clinical background working with adolescents and young adults.

Giles is a consultant with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s Bureau of Substance Abuse Services and the Center for Social Innovation. She teaches at Lesley University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and has clinical background working with adolescents and young adults.

Temple Isaiah will host a community conversation on the opiate crisis, titled “The Opiate Crisis in Massachusetts: Causes and Solutions,” at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 12 at 55 Lincoln St., Lexington.

Sponsored by the Temple Isaiah Mental Health Team, the event will feature speaker Maggie Giles, who will explore the opiate trends in society as well as steps already taken to combat the problem.
Giles is a consultant with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s Bureau of Substance Abuse Services and the Center for Social Innovation. She teaches at Lesley University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and has clinical background working with adolescents and young adults.

Refreshments will be served 7 p.m., and a Q&A and group discussion will follow the presentation. Temple Isaiah is handicapped-accessible.

For information: generalinfo@templeisaiah.net.

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The Cary Library Foundation Report to the Community

The Cary Library Foundation Annual Report

The Cary Library Foundation Annual Report

Click image to read report.

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Community Endowment of Lexington Distributes $30,000 to Local Nonprofits

From left to right, Leslie Zales; Marcia Gens, LexGWAC; George Murnaghan, Lex Eat Together; Ricki Pappo, LexGWAC; Susan Schiffer, LexFarm; Allison Guerette, LexFarm; Gerard Cody, Lexington Office of Public Health.

From left to right, Leslie Zales; Marcia Gens, LexGWAC; George Murnaghan, Lex Eat Together; Ricki Pappo, LexGWAC; Susan Schiffer, LexFarm; Allison Guerette, LexFarm; Gerard Cody, Lexington Office of Public Health.

Grants Will Aid Health & Human Services, Ecological Well-Being, And Community Building Initiatives

June 10, 2016: The Community Endowment of Lexington (CEL), an endowed fund of Foundation for MetroWest, recently hosted its third annual Grant Award Ceremony at the Lexington Community Center where they distributed $30,000 to four local nonprofit organizations in the areas of Health & Human Services, Ecological Well-Being, and Community Building. To date, CEL has granted more than $80,000 to 13 nonprofit organizations serving the Lexington community.

Leslie Zales, outgoing CEL Chair reflected on a “pioneering year”, especially in the areas of fundraising and community awareness. “It is truly wonderful watching this initiative take hold in Lexington – from the generosity of the community in response to the Leslie and Colin Masson Challenge to the diversity and number of organizations working to enrich our town, including tonight’s grantees.”

At the event, the Chinese American Association of Lexington, Lexx Restaurant, and Finnegan Development were recognized for their vision, commitment and community support as CEL Civic Founders. Additionally, the event celebrated the service of retiring board members Pauline Benninga, Lisa Spitz and youth representative to the Board, Hannah Cutler.

2016 Grantees:
• Lexington Community Farm Coalition ($10,000)
To enable the organization to move to the next level in their growth, providing consulting services for board development, an analytics dashboard, and a business plan for long-term planning across the different program areas.
• Lexington Global Warming Action Coalition ($7,500)
To run a large scale “Sustainability Fair” coordinating initiatives by and for Lexington town government, businesses, and residents highlighting health, energy, resilience, and sustainability in the face of climate change.
• Lexington Office of Public Health ($7,500)
To do a quantitative tick survey in order to assess the risks to the community and provide an educational public health program for residents about tick-borne diseases.
• Lex Eat Together ($5,000)
To pilot a transportation program for greater and broader access to their weekly dinners by those who do not have access to needed transportation.


About the Community Endowment of Lexington:

The Community Endowment of Lexington, an endowed fund of the Foundation for MetroWest, promotes a spirit of philanthropic giving to help enhance the quality of life for all Lexington residents now, and for the future. CEL is a permanent grantmaking source of funding to support our community needs and opportunities, and provide ways for donors to give back or leave a legacy to our community. For more information, visit www.lexingtonendowment.org.

About Foundation for MetroWest

Established in 1995, the Foundation for MetroWest is the only community foundation serving the 33 cities and towns in the region. We promote philanthropy in the region, help donors maximize the impact of their local giving, serve as a resource for local nonprofits and enhance the quality of life for all our residents. Since inception, the Foundation has granted $11.6 million to charitable organizations and currently stewards more than $16 million in charitable assets for current needs and future impact.

To learn more, please visitfoundationformetrowest.org or call 508.647.2260.
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Swing Night at LHS

Swing Night Organizers and Pura Vida Project Members, Catherine Fiore’17 (L) and Allie Antonevich’17 (R)

Swing Night Organizers and Pura Vida Project Members, Catherine Fiore’17 (L) and Allie Antonevich’17 (R)

By Ami Stix
Lexington High School’s annual Swing Night – an evening of fun with part of the proceeds going to the pura vida project, a student-run, nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children and young families throughout Central America.

Swing Night 2016 celebrated, once again, the classic American sounds of big band and swing with three hours of live music and dancing. More than 100 guests of all ages took to the dance floor in the Fiske gymnasium as the LHS Big Band, Jazz Ensemble and special guest, The Beantown Swing Orchestra took to the stage.

The evening was a delightful experience for those who could remember this uplifting music from their youth and for those that were new to the Big Band genre. The Boston Lindy Bomb Squad kicked off the evening with a lesson, teaching the basics to those born long after the boom in Big Band had ended.

The Boston Lindy Bomb Squad kicked off the evening with a lesson, inspiring young and old to take to the dance floor and swing!

The Boston Lindy Bomb Squad kicked off the evening with a lesson, inspiring young and old to take to the dance floor and swing!

Originally conceived as an event to raise money for various causes, Swing Night has become a staple of LHS Commencement week festivities as well as an opportunity to support a worthy cause. The first was in 2007 and called Dancing for Darfur. It featured Jazz Combo, Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Big Band. In this case, the Pura Vida Project of Lexington was the beneficiary. Families attend to support their musicians, graduates return to see friends and, increasingly, members of the community and local swing enthusiasts attend to hear some of the best live jazz west of Boston.

Above: Emily Zhang ‘17 and Ester Zhao ‘17

Above: Emily Zhang ‘17 and Ester Zhao ‘17

Alumni Involvement
LHS Alum, Frank Hsieh’89 has been instrumental in propelling the popularity of Swing Night with his tremendous 18-piece orchestra as well as spreading his passion for the elegance and vitality of this jazz form. Hsieh took jazz improvisation classes at LHS and played in various combos and ensembles. He continued playing during his time at Cornell, forming his own band as an undergraduate. An avid swing enthusiast and dancer, he decided to start a large swing orchestra upon moving back to Boston. He credits Jeff Leonard as the most influential person in helping him to reach a high level of artistry and focus as jazz musician and for inspiring him to pass on those lessons to younger musicians with his orchestra.

Special guest The Beantown Swing Orchestra

Special guest The Beantown Swing Orchestra

Now in its 10th year, the Beantown Swing Orchestra is considered to represent the future of Big Band. Hseih (pronounced Shay) founded the ensemble with a mission to promote classic big band swing music and its history to younger generations and keep this music alive for future generations to enjoy. His band, whose members range in age from their teens to their early thirties, is a continuation of the tradition of the danceable swing style of bandleaders such as Benny Goodman and Count Basie.

LHS Jazz Ensemble trumpeter, Alex Tung’19, and Belmont resident, Clare Stanley, getting ready to try out a few steps.

LHS Jazz Ensemble trumpeter, Alex Tung’19, and Belmont resident, Clare Stanley, getting ready to try out a few steps.

The LHS Experience
Justin Aramati, director of the LHS Big Band considers swing music and swing dancing critical parts of the histories of Jazz and America. A term of praise for playing with a strong, rhythmic groove or drive, swing was the dominant form of American popular music from 1935 to 1945. It was the music of orchestras, led by masters like Glenn Miller and Tommy Dorsey, that first crossed societal barriers in appealing to young men and women of all races. “Swing Night is an opportunity for our students to experience that history in a direct and meaningful way. Getting to be a dance band for a night is fun! It’s also a way for us to connect with our community. It’s great to see so many people come out to dance,” says Aramati with a shy smile.
It is impressive to see these young musicians bring so much passion to classics that were popular with their grandparents. Music ranged from the elegant arrangements of Ellington and Carter to the playful rhythms of “Don’t Get Sassy” and “Count Bubba.” Featured student vocalist, Katharine Courtemanche was fresh and polished as she made Count Basie’s “Every Day I Have the Blues” her own.

Community Service
In the tradition of supporting worthy causes, student involvement also extends to Swing Night’s charitable partners. For the last few years, a portion of the proceeds have benefited the Pura Vida Project, a student-run, nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of children and young families throughout Central America. The PVP is comprised of approximately forty students from Lexington High School and beyond who share a passion for Latin American culture and for meaningful philanthropy. This year’s contribution will benefit the Latin American Children’s Fund.
Student organizers, Allie Antonevich’17 and Catherine Fiore’17–with a small army of PVP volunteers–managed the logistics of the evening: staffing the event and making sure that band directors and their musicians could focus on the evening’s performance.

Both young women found the project incredibly gratifying for a variety of reasons and expressed great satisfaction in being part of an effort that brought the community together for a common purpose. “I like that we are working for a cause outside of LHS. It’s something that is bigger than all of us,” Ms. Fiore pointed out. Swing Night represents Lexington at its best: its students, its music program and the ever-present desire to give back to the community. The evening has become a multi-generational celebration of culture, music and the sheer joy of dance. If you missed it this year, make sure your dancing shoes are shined for next June.

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The Old Guard Performs in Lexington!

Old Guard Promo

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Patriots’ Day Resources and Activities

24_1_LexVC_WithBuntingLexington Visitors’ Center

Obtain tour brochures, maps and directions to historical sites and events. View diorama of Battle of Lexington. 1875 Massachusetts Avenue, across from Cary Library.
781-862-1450. Public restrooms.

 


Liberty Ride Tours

Saturday & Sunday 10 am-4 pm
Liberty RideA unique 90 minute trolley tour of the historic Battle Road. Tickets required. Board at the Lexington Visitors Center, 1875 Massachusetts Avenue, Lexington Center.
www.libertyride.us

 

 


 

In Their Own Words

7sm ITOW Redcoats Huzzah (2)Performance
Sunday, April 17th 8PM at Pilgrim Church

Developed by Lexington author Rick Beyers, In Their Own Words is drawn from actual eyewitness accounts of the first hours of the Revolutionary War. Costumed actors speak from primary documents – diaries, depositions, letters and sermons. Real-life characters trace the story from Paul Revere’s ride, to the first shots on Lexington Common, through the Redcoats’ bloody retreat on the day the Revolution began.
www.lexingtonhistory.org


Parker’s Revenge & Tower Park – Saturday, April 16th

10am

Parker’s Revenge

Lexington Minutemen gather on the Lexington Battle Green to reenact the second call to arms from Captain Parker with additional dialogue from Reverend Jonas Clarke. Following this event the Minutemen will march to Parker’s Revenge site on Route 2A near the Minuteman National Park Visitors Site for a wreath laying. Freewreath laying and musket salute. FREE lexingtonminutemen.com

1pm

Parker’s Revenge Salute

Parker’s Revenge Ceremonial Salute Marrett Road & Old Massachusetts Avenue. FREE
2:00 pm Parker’s Revenge Scenario Battle Road trail behind Minute Man National Park Visitor Center, Rt 2A, Lexington.
www.nps.gov/mima/patriots-day.htm

4pm

Tower Park Battle

4pm Tower Park Battle The Tower Park battle re-enactment starts near Munroe Tavern at 4:00. British and Colonial Reenactors reenact a Revolutionary War battle, using period-appropriate weapons and tactics. Come early for a tour of Munroe and watch the Redcoats prepare. Tower Park is on Massachusetts Avenue opposite Pelham Road. FREE
www.lexingtonminutemen.com


 

Battle Green Guided Tours

Battlegreen Guided ToursBattle Green Guided Tours Official Lexington Battle Green Guides in Colonial clothing offer informal tours, history, visitor information and directions throughout the day. Stand where the local Militia faced the British Regulars at sunrise on April 19, 1775. View one of the oldest war memorials in the country where the remains of 7 of the 8 Militia who died on the Battle Green on April 19th are buried. FREE www.tourlexington.us

 


 

Hancock Church Annual Patriots’ Day Handbell Concert


Bell2Home
Monday April 18th from 11:15am–12pm

Annual Patriots’ Day Handbell Concert of Patriotic and American music The concert is family-friendly and includes music played on 5 octaves of hand bells and 6 octaves of hand chimes, sure to please all ages: jazz by Duke Ellington, American rag, movie music, spirituals, and patriotic songs. Suggested donation of $3 per person to benefit the Russell School in Dorchester after school music program. Hancock Church, 1912 Massachusetts Avenue.

 

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Patriots’ Day 2016 – Schedule of Events

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